Women in Art History

When you visit famous art museums and browse art history books with your kids you may notice a lack of women artists represented in the mix.

It's Women's History Month – let's explore a few sensational women from art history!

March is Women’s History Month, so let’s look at just a few amazing women artists you can study in your homeschool this month!

Georgia O’Keeffe

O’Keeffe painted cityscapes, landscapes, and even pineapples. She’s best known for her large flower paintings that brought the viewer right up into the flower itself – offering a new perspective.

Frida Kahlo

Frida Kahlo suffered from illness and injury for most of her life, but even when she was confined to her home, Casa Azul, she was busy creating. She was bold, eccentric and stylish, and she painted dozens of self-portraits exploring her internal world.

Mary Cassatt

Mary Cassatt was a pioneer of Impressionist art. Being a woman gave her entry into a domestic world that male painters rarely saw. She painted women in society (at the opera and the theater), and she painted women at home (intimate portraits of mothers with their children).

Lee Krasner

Lee Krasner was a cornerstone of the Abstract Expressionist art movement. Although she is often known as Jackson Pollock’s wife, she created art before she met him, and after his untimely death. Some say it was her influential connections that made Pollock’s art so famous! (We spent a month studying Lee Krasner’s art in The Studio! If you plan to join us when enrollment opens, you’ll have access to that archived lesson as part of your membership.)

Elisabeth Louise Vigée Le Brun

Elisabeth Louise Vigée Le Brun was a neo-classical painter who is most famous for painting Queen Marie-Antoinette’s portrait – over 20 of them – at Versailles.

Cindy Sherman

Cindy Sherman is a contemporary photographer. She stages elaborate ‘selfie’ style photos where she dresses up in costume and portrays different characters. Her art is humorous, unsettling, and provocative.

I am trying to make other people recognize something of themselves rather than me.
— Cindy Sherman


Berthe Morisot

Berthe Morisot painted durning the same time as Mary Cassatt. Like Cassatt, she painted domestic scenes and also en plein air landscapes.

Helen Frankenthaler

Helen Frankenthaler was an abstract expressionist artist who created a totally new way of painting – her innovative soak-stain technique!

Louise Bourgeois

Louise Bourgeois created enormous spider sculptures. She titled them ‘Maman’ which means ‘mother’ in French. She used art as an outlet for her complicated emotions and her unresolved family conflicts. (We spent a month studying Louise Bourgeois’s art in The Studio! If you plan to join us when enrollment opens, you’ll have access to that archived lesson as part of your membership.)

Faith Ringgold

Faith Ringgold is an artist, an activist, and a celebrated children’s author! She makes story quilts where she combines her love of writing with the art of quilting – connecting her art to her African American heritage.(We spent last month studying Faith Ringgold’s art in The Studio! If you plan to join us when enrollment opens, you’ll have access to that archived lesson as part of your membership.)

In this video, Ringgold speaks about her mission to bring more awareness to art created by women.

Books to explore more


Let's connect! 

Which of these amazing women will you study this month? Come join our private Facebook group and let's chat! Post photos of your kids and their art, or just browse around and get inspiration!