The Women of Abstract Expressionism

Helen Frankenthaler, Lee Krasner, and Judith Godwin aren't among the "big names" in art history that you hear all the time... but they should be!

This month in The Studio, we're focusing exclusively on these three revolutionary pioneers of the Abstract Expressionist movement... and you're invited to join us!


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Art Appreciation for kids – Explore famous artists with kids – The women of Abstract Expressionism. Learn all about Helen Frankenthaler, Lee Krasner, and Judith Godwin.

Let's Meet Helen Frankenthaler, Lee Krasner, and Judith Godwin

Helen Frankenthaler, Lee Krasner, and the women of abstract expressionism. Art lessons for kids.

Helen Frankenthaler was an American artist who lived from 1928-2011. She developed a signature painting method called the soak-stain technique where she poured thinned down oil paint directly onto a canvas she laid flat on the floor.

 Helen Frankenthaler,  Mountains and Sea,  1952. ©Helen Frankenthaler Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Helen Frankenthaler, Mountains and Sea, 1952. ©Helen Frankenthaler Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

There are no rules. That is how art is born, how breakthroughs happen. Go against the rules or ignore the rules. That is what invention is about.
— Helen Frankenthaler

Helen Frankenthaler, Lee Krasner, and the women of abstract expressionism. Art lessons for kids.
 Lee Krasner,  Mysteries,  1972. ©Pollock Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Lee Krasner, Mysteries, 1972. ©Pollock Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Lee Krasner is often remembered as Jackson Pollock's wife. But many people don't realize she created an amazing body of artwork – even before she met Jackson, and she continued to paint for three decades after his untimely death.

Her art hangs in museums all around the world and she's considered one of the main influencers of the Abstract Expressionist movement.

She said this about her art: "All my work keeps going like a pendulum; it seems to swing back to something I was involved with earlier, or it moves between horizontality and verticality, circularity, or a composite of them. For me, I suppose that change is the only constant."

 

 


When I recognize an emerging form, I respond intuitively by evolving complimentary sub-forms in colors and applications that feel supportive and foster development.
— Judith Godwin
 Judith Godwin,  Epic,  1959. Photograph by Lee Stalsworth. © Judith Godwin

Judith Godwin, Epic, 1959. Photograph by Lee Stalsworth. © Judith Godwin

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Judith Godwin was inspired by things like Japanese zen philosophies, modern dance, and nature. She was good friends with Martha Graham, and the movement and energy she expressed in her dancing influenced many of Godwin's paintings.


More to explore! Suggested reading...


This month in The Studio membership, we'll learn all about Helen Frankenthaler, Lee Krasner, Judith Godwin, and the Abstract Expressionist movement! 

It's going to be such an AMAZING month! We'll start our study on Monday, September 3, and members of The Studio will receive an easy to follow lesson plan each Monday!

Each month we follow the same outline:

  • Week 1- Introduction and overview
  • Week 2- Going deeper (focus on one aspect of the art)
  • Week 3- Connecting the dots (relating it to other subjects)
  • Week 4- Review and explore more

Enrollment is open– but it will be closing on September 21! Come join us and see how much fun you and your kids can have with art!

If you are new to Art History Kids, and you haven't heard about The Studio... let me tell you a little bit about it!

The Studio is a monthly membership that helps you cover a new art history topic with your kids each month– effortlessly!

Your Membership Works Like This... You get:

  1. A new fun theme to explore each month. We look at art from lots of different time periods, and from artists all around the world.
  2. Easy to follow lesson plans delivered each Monday. Begin your week with creativity! It's effortless with lesson plans from The Studio greeting you each Monday morning. You'll practice the art of conversation with pre-planned discussion guides and chat prompts that will lead you in some great art talks with your kids. Never wonder which book to read! Book lists are all researched for you. And, your kids will love the open-ended project ideas every week. They're always process-oriented, so the artistic journey is more important than the destination. Finally, you'll learn to implement The One Thing Theory. It's my secret trick that banishes homeschool overwhelm for good!
  3. Personalized feedback from me. Email me any time. I'll usually get back to you the same day.
  4. Access to Welcome Week. When you join, we'll spend a week looking at different aspects of the membership, and you'll get a guided tour to walk you through everything. I'll also share tips on how to set up an amazing art area for your kids, and how to store all of their masterpieces in an easy and organized system.  
  5. Access to several months of archived lessons. There will be several months of previous activities waiting for you in addition to the current month's topic. 

Here's what members are saying:

I am a writer, not an artist. I love that the studio allows me to connect deeply with art and explore it in a way that is meaningful for my children (one who wants to be an artist herself.) It’s a gift.
— Elizabeth
The Studio is a wonderful open-and-go resource for your home education. My children (and me) have been introduced to such beauty and interesting topics this past year. I like that we can expand on the month’s topic to include nature study, geography, history, and science. The Studio has become a core resource for our homeschool.
— Darlene

You can read lots more about The Studio, and if you feel your kids (and you!) would like to try it out, you can join us in July. There's no long term commitment... your membership is month-to-month, and this month only you'll have a chance to preview the membership for a full week before you are charged! See if it's right for you and your kids, and let me know if you have any questions. I'm always here to help.